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May 27, 2019 • 15m 32sec

Surprise: the status quo election

Scott Morrison’s win should not have been a surprise - Australia has been stuck on the same voting divide since 2010. We fractured first, before Trump or Brexit.

May 28, 2019 • 14m40s

The Mothers’ Resistance

Since its introduction, ParentsNext has been a controversial welfare program – but there is a mothers’ resistance mounting against it.

May 29, 2019 • 14m41s

Death of a president

Before his death, the former president of Nauru explained how a deal with Australia to open a detention centre destroyed democracy in his country.

May 30, 2019 • 16m04s

From the Heart

Having once been rejected by government, the Uluru Statement from the Heart is readying for referendum.

May 31, 2019 • 12m45s

What Morrison did next

Two weeks after the election, Scott Morrison has identified 10 seats the Coalition wants to win.

Jun 3, 2019 • 19m 20s

Albanese speaking

Anthony Albanese didn’t always expect to be Labor leader but now he’s in the job, he’s not going anywhere.

Jun 4, 2019 • 12m31s

Morrison’s broad church

Scott Morrison’s cabinet is a careful balance between those who backed him during last year’s leadership spill, and those who backed Peter Dutton.

Jun 5, 2019 • 15m22s

A mistake of fact

How “Mistake of Fact” makes drunkenness a legal defence for serious crimes, and the campaign to change that.

Jun 6, 2019 • 15m35s

Charlie Teo, virtuosic rebel

Charlie Teo is Australia’s best-known surgeon. His career asks difficult questions about the balance between hope and orthodoxy.

Jun 7, 2019 • 14m40s

Rates, raids and meeting the Queen

Scott Morrison flies back from meeting the Queen to a flagging economy and concern over raids on the ABC and other reporters.

Jun 11, 2019 • 15m13s

Sacking Scott Morrison

Before entering parliament, Scott Morrison ran Tourism Australia. He was sacked by the minister, but the details of what happened have never been made public.

Jun 12, 2019 • 14m40s

Breaking up big tech

Once a radical thought, the idea of breaking up tech giants to help regulate them is gaining traction with politicians and tech entrepreneurs.

Jun 13, 2019 • 13m16s

Trade war now

As the trade war escalates between China and the United States, it’s the US that has become the radical actor.

Jun 14, 2019 • 14m48s

The Morrison vacuum

As Scott Morrison searches for a path to legislate his tax cuts, concerns over press freedom continue to trouble his government.

Jun 17, 2019 • 13m04s

A shooting in Darwin

The mass shooting in Darwin was the worst in Australia since Port Arthur, but it received little attention. What happens to the people left behind?

Jun 18, 2019 • 16m50s

Looking for Mike Cannon-Brookes

As Al Gore continues his fight against climate change, Mike Cannon-Brookes has become the movement’s Australian face.

Jun 19, 2019 • 16m 39s

Turnbull’s stray dog

The election result has put faith back on the national agenda. But the issue is dogged by a review Malcolm Turnbull commissioned and never had the chance to answer.

Jun 20, 2019 • 14m20s

Gaming the gaming industry

Australia records higher gambling losses than any country in the world, while the sector uses faulty research to avoid regulation.

Jun 21, 2019 • 14m15s

Double bluffs and Cory Bernardi

As Labor and the Coalition explore a double bluff on tax cuts, Cory Bernardi wants back into the Liberal Party.

Jun 24, 2019 • 15m24s

The insecurity machine

The election was shaped by the character of two men. Its outcome shows us how the country reacts to insecurity, and what that means for change.

Jun 25, 2019 • 15m57s

Rosie Batty’s private grief

Rosie Batty talks to Martin McKenzie-Murray about grief and healing.

Jun 26, 2019 • 17m04s

Protest in Hong Kong

As millions protest on the streets of Hong Kong, the democratic freedoms promised in the handover to China are being tested.

Jun 27, 2019 • 16m29s

Israel Folau’s cycle of sin

Following the sacking of Israel Folau by Rugby Australia, a fissure has opened up in the debate over equality and freedoms.

Jun 28, 2019 • 16m21s

Condemned to interesting times

As Labor loses party discipline over tax cuts, the Coalition enters into an ugly post-mortem of its leadership change.

Jul 1, 2019 • 14m59s

Morrison’s inner circle

Scott Morrison’s inner circle is a group linked by faith and friendship – and now, the front bench. Their ties were confirmed during the leadership spill last year.

Jul 2, 2019 • 13m52s

Mine on the moon

The discovery of water ice on the moon has started a new space race – and opened a legal frontier in which Australia has a unique role.

Jul 3, 2019 • 16m34s

The sperm donor question

The high court has found that sperm donors can have fathers’ rights, but the ruling is inherently conservative.

Jul 4, 2019 • 14m23s

Repealing medivac

As the government pushes to repeal the medivac legislation, lawyers and doctors contradict the arguments put against it.

Jul 5, 2019 • 12m48s

Faith and taxes

As Scott Morrison’s tax cuts make their way through the parliament, there are fresh questions over religious freedoms.

Jul 8, 2019 • 14m48s

The broken pendulum

The pendulum that is used to predict outcomes in elections is broken. One unexpected consequence is for the role of money in politics.

Jul 9, 2019 • 16m50s

Cancelling citizens

As the government produces legislation to temporarily ban foreign fighters from returning to Australia, there is growing concern over whether existing citizenship legislation is unconstitutional.

Jul 10, 2019 • 14m07s

Scott Morrison and the Laffer napkin

Scott Morrison’s tax cuts are based on an American theory of economics trialled in the 1970s, but the evidence since suggests it does not work.

Jul 11, 2019 • 19m01s

Surviving Australia’s biggest cult, The Family

Following the death of cult leader Anne Hamilton-Byrne, surviving members of The Family reckon with judgement.

Jul 12, 2019 • 16m18s

A Voice and a prayer

Scott Morrison began the week praying in front of 21,000 people. He closed it promising a referendum on an Indigenous Voice to Parliament.

Jul 15, 2019 • 17m38s

The extinction rebellion

Extinction Rebellion is not focusing on one project; it’s focusing on the system as a whole. And change can come from just a small segment of society participating in sustained non-compliance.

Jul 16, 2019 • 14m44s

The truth about small government

Scott Morrison’s signature achievement could be the tax cuts he legislated earlier this month – although not for the reasons he believes.

Jul 17, 2019 • 13m31s

Guarding the henhouse

Almost two years since changes were implemented following a royal commission into youth detention, tear gas is again being used on children in the Northern Territory.

Jul 18, 2019 • 14m45s

Understanding Scott Morrison’s Pentecostalism

To understand Scott Morrison, it helps to understand his faith. Tanya Levin is a former Pentecostal who argues that the church informs every aspect of his politics.

Jul 19, 2019 • 14m36s

The ballad of Trump and ScoMo

With Scott Morrison emerging as a Donald Trump favourite, there are questions to ask about the meaning of their association.

Jul 22, 2019 • 17m18s

China’s military and the plan for dominance

As China seeks to assert dominance, Australia finds itself upping the stakes in a game it doesn’t want to play.

Jul 23, 2019 • 15m50s

On Uluru

Despite hopes that were placed in Ken Wyatt as minister, Scott Morrison says there will be no constitutional enshrinement of an Indigenous Voice to parliament. Karen Middleton on the campaign to keep the Voice alive.

Jul 24, 2019 • 12m54s

High-rise catastrophe

A softening in the housing market has shown up defects and flaws that were being hidden by demand.

Jul 25, 2019 • 13m24s

The march of the older voter

As older voters become a larger and more powerful voting bloc, they are also becoming more organised.

Jul 26, 2019 • 15m12s

Labor strategy and ‘the secret agenda’

The Labor Party has come back to parliament with a plan to ignore Scott Morrison, making the most of an ill-disciplined backbench.

Jul 29, 2019 • 19m08s

Ending domestic violence

Australia is ahead of the world in some of its responses to domestic violence, but its national plan has no measurable targets.

Jul 30, 2019 •

Cyber spy powers

Home Affairs is pushing for new powers to allow the Australian Signals Directorate to embed in corporate computer systems – transforming the body into one that disrupts crime and other attacks.

Jul 31, 2019 • 14m50s

Cooling in the Pacific

Climate change is now the defining issue for the Pacific. It is also one of the factors undermining Australia’s relationship with the region.

Aug 1, 2019 • 13m42s

The case for raising Newstart

As the campaign to raise Newstart intensifies, details emerge of who is actually living on the payment and for how long.

Aug 2, 2019 • 14m15s

Betting against integrity

Amid claims of misconduct against Crown Casino, Labor and the Coalition voted down a parliamentary inquiry into the affair.

Aug 5, 2019 • 17m14s

The Latham Moment

Just on 15 years ago, almost half the country voted for Mark Latham. Now, the former Labor leader is a One Nation representative who could play a significant role in the new right.

Aug 6, 2019 • 14m05s

Game, Setka, match

As the Morrison government pushes for legislation to more easily deregister unions, there are questions over timing and the new laws’ real intent.

Aug 7, 2019 • 14m31s

Racism and the judge

As a judge’s comments about Aboriginal people cause outrage, lawyers in the Northern Territory wonder why a key body hasn’t made a complaint.

Aug 8, 2019 • 15m26s

A question of dignity

After Kate O’Halloran’s grandmother was placed in residential care, her family complained about her treatment. The centre responded by threatening to withdraw her place.

Aug 9, 2019 • 15m28s

Rodney Rude diplomacy

A visit from US ministers gives a clearer picture of what America wants. But as Trump’s trade war with China escalates, it also sets the stakes for Scott Morrison’s visit to Washington.

Aug 12, 2019 • 16m38s

Murdoch and the far-right

For the first time ever, individual articles can be linked to far-right recruitment drives. High on the list is reporting from The Australian, in stories about Safe Schools as well as about race.

Aug 13, 2019 • 15m50s

On politics and gambling

The refusal of the major parties to hold a parliamentary inquiry into Crown Casino speaks to a larger relationship between politics and the gambling lobby. It’s not just donations: Labor draws millions in profits from poker machines it owns.

Aug 14, 2019 • 14m58s

Schoolyard bullies

In the past decade, reports of teachers and principals being abused by parents have increased. Jane Caro on accounts that range from intimidation to stalking.

Aug 15, 2019 • 16m11s

Sperm in the time of Facebook

A strict legal framework means there is a shortage of sperm donors across Australia. But online there is a huge and unregulated market of people willing to donate.

Aug 16, 2019 • 15m40s

Hastie and Morrison

As the Morrison government begins its inquiry into press freedom, there is concern about the bipartisanship of the committee hearing it. At the centre is Andrew Hastie.

Aug 19, 2019 • 15m47s

Booing Adam Goodes

Adam Goodes’s AFL career was played at the intersection of race and politics. Stan Grant on what his story says about white Australia.

Aug 20, 2019 • 17m01s

Is China a threat?

As Xi Jinping increases his power and ambition, there is tension over the influence China has in Australia. Progressive critics finds themselves aligned with right-wing voices.

Aug 21, 2019 • 17m33s

Saving the birthing trees

As the Andrews government attempts to negotiate treaty with First Nations people in Victoria, it is proceeding with a plan to bulldoze hundreds of sacred Djab Wurrung trees.

Aug 22, 2019 • 18m24s

Drugs in swimming

The furore over Australian swimmer Mack Horton’s stand against long-time rival Sun Yang underscores confusion about how drug testing in sport actually works.

Aug 23, 2019 • 17m12s

Scott Morrison vs. the World

As he arrives for talks in Vietnam, Scott Morrison is struggling to match his attempts at diplomacy with his position on climate change.

Aug 26, 2019 • 15m20s

Grief, anger and climate change

Joelle Gergis is one of Australia’s leading climate scientists. She says there is resistance to talking about emotions around science, but she feels grief and anger.

Aug 27, 2019 • 15m38s

Scott Morrison’s middle class

Scott Morrison says the middle class doesn’t trust the public service. The problem is available research says the opposite.

Aug 28, 2019 • 16m20s

Inside the Greens

The Greens is a party with a leader who many think is too mainstream, struggling with the growing pains of infighting and factionalism. It is also on the cusp of another step change.

Aug 29, 2019 • 15m21s

Home Affairs’ propaganda machine

When a communications agency started contacting Muslim Australians for social media training, no one realised they were being pulled into Home Affairs’ propaganda machine.

Aug 30, 2019 • 17m49s

Timor bug, China spy

While Australia remains belligerent over the Witness K case, Canberra is standing up to Beijing over the imprisonment of Yang Hengjun.

Sep 2, 2019 • 17m54s

Badiucao, Chinese dissident

Months before the latest protests in Hong Kong, the Chinese government shut down an art exhibition by Chinese-Australian dissident Badiucao. This is his story.

Sep 3, 2019 • 16m49s

Reporting the Panama Papers

The reporter behind the Panama Papers, Bastian Obermayer, on how he handled the leak and what he has found in Australia.

Sep 4, 2019 • 14m53s

American secrets

As Brian Toohey releases his major book on national security in Australia, he reveals that American spies have been working here without detection.

Sep 5, 2019 • 15m43s

The truth about wages

The reality of the wage debate in Australia is that companies are geared to pay dividends rather than to invest in growth – and the treasurer’s intervention does nothing to change that.

Sep 6, 2019 • 16m16s

What Morrison didn’t expect in Biloela

How support for a Tamil family in Biloela blindsided the government and caused the prime minister to panic.

Sep 9, 2019 • 15m31s

The revolving door

Inside the Royal Commission into Victoria’s Mental Health System, a place that is dysfunctional, inflexible and underfunded.

Sep 10, 2019 • 15m48s

Inside the Adani blockade

There is fresh momentum behind the Adani mine in central Queensland. What happens next could define Australia’s relationship to climate change both here and globally.

Sep 11, 2019 • 14m38s

Christian Porter’s integrity commission

As ICAC exposes apparent corruption in NSW, focus is drawn on the government’s integrity commission, which, among other things, could not make findings of corruption.

Sep 12, 2019 • 16m59s

The Daddy Quota

When Annabel Crabb decided to find out what happens to men’s work habits when they have children, she discovered a huge store of gendered norms and inequality.

Sep 13, 2019 • 16m29s

Holding onto Gladys Liu

As some backbenchers express doubt that Gladys Liu can stay in parliament, Scott Morrison is digging in behind his MP.

Sep 16, 2019 • 19m11s

Inside the meat disco

When the impresario behind Earthcore died last year, he left behind a legacy of paranoia, intimidation and financial mismanagement.

Sep 17, 2019 • 17m35s

Scott Morrison’s poverty fix

As Scott Morrison announces punitive welfare plans, Rick Morton asks what happens when you treat poverty as a moral problem.

Sep 18, 2019 • 15m10s

Return to Timor-Leste

Twenty years after Timor-Leste’s vote for independence, the country’s relationship with Australia remains fraught.

Sep 19, 2019 • 16m49s

What’s eating Philip Lowe

Philip Lowe is the governor of the Reserve Bank. He is a conventional person who’s been pushed by the economy to make unconventional choices.

Sep 20, 2019 • 16m44s

Scott goes to Washington

Tomorrow, Scott Morrison will be received in Washington on a state visit. It highlights his special relationship with Donald Trump and his difficulty with Beijing.

Sep 23, 2019 • 17m25s

Inside the Tanya Day inquest

Tanya Day died after being arrested for drunkenness. A coroner is now asking whether systemic racism contributed to her death.

Sep 24, 2019 • 17m25s

Death of the speech

Don Watson on the end of speech making in politics, and how the loss of narrative undermines bold policy.

Sep 25, 2019 • 16m24s

Running the NDIS

As a royal commission into disability care begins, it emerges that key emails relating to the NDIS are held on a private bank server and cannot be accessed.

Sep 26, 2019 • 18m27s

Convicting a Newcastle priest

When former Anglican dean Graeme Lawrence was found guilty of child sexual abuse, his victim, Ben Giggins, made the unusual decision to request that the court name him publicly.

Sep 30, 2019 • 15m49s

Part one: The murder of Eurydice Dixon

One of the terrible facts about the day Jaymes Todd killed Eurydice Dixon is that for him it was almost all very ordinary.

Oct 1, 2019 • 19m19s

Part two: The sentencing of Jaymes Todd

The judge who sentenced Jaymes Todd for the rape and murder of Eurydice Dixon was asked to consider Todd’s age, autism diagnosis and early guilty plea.

Oct 2, 2019 • 16m17s

Almonds are the devil’s nut

The Murray–Darling Basin is being ruined by cronyism and incompetence. But there is a new problem, too: high-yield almond crops.

Oct 3, 2019 • 17m02s

What drives Penny Wong

Penny Wong is the intellectual leader of the Labor Party. Now the subject of a major biography, her politics is shaped by her experiences of difference and her belief in compassion.

Oct 4, 2019 • 15m34s

Trump, Morrison, money and the drought

As Scott Morrison tried to shift Australia’s focus to the drought, and the cash rate fell below 1 per cent, Donald Trump’s paranoia followed the prime minister home.

Oct 7, 2019 • 15m24s

Who is Scott Morrison?

Scott Morrison shares a rhetorical lineage with Robert Menzies and a suburban one with John Howard. But what worked then might not work now.

Oct 8, 2019 • 16m56s

Growing old in a pyramid scheme

The aged-care sector is on the brink of collapse. The major providers have been propped up by a government bailout, but without reform they cannot keep operating.

Oct 9, 2019 • 16m57s

Carbon, beef and the underground economy

The latest IPCC report says current farming practices are unsustainable. But there are solutions, if farmers want to change.

Oct 10, 2019 • 16m09s

The Monthly Awards 2019

Each year, The Monthly assembles a panel of critics and artists to decide The Monthly Awards. This episode showcases the winners.

Oct 11, 2019 • 16m04s

The luck and the chutzpah

As the Liberal Party slides further on climate change, the Labor Party fights an internal push to abandon its platform.

Oct 14, 2019 • 17m00s

Spies and Chinese money

Australia’s relationship with Chinese investment has been remade in the past six years. David Uren on how ASIO helped transform the Foreign Investment Review Board.

Oct 15, 2019 • 14m32s

Exclusive: Forfeited to state care

A dispute over funding and the NDIS has forced 500 families to forfeit their children into state care.

Oct 16, 2019 • 15m28s

Peter Dutton’s war on dissent

From anti-protest legislation to funding cuts, this government has waged war on dissent. In recent weeks, its rhetoric has intensified.

Oct 17, 2019 • 15m14s

Cash and the black economy

New legislation will restrict the way Australians use cash. But there are concerns the laws could jail people for using legal tender.

Oct 18, 2019 • 15m21s

That won’t feed one cow

As Scott Morrison attempts to control the message on handling the drought, there is bad news for his claims to strong economic management.

Oct 21, 2019 • 16m43s

A classroom full of dollars

The boom in international education has seen students become commodities. It has also changed the way universities operate - chasing rankings and casualising teaching staff.

Oct 22, 2019 • 14m26s

Restarting robo-debt

An error at the Department of Human Services caused the original robo-debt algorithm to restart, issuing thousands of unchecked debt notices.

Oct 23, 2019 • 17m48s

Out of office

As Labor waits for a review of its election loss, and another into the operations of its NSW branch, Anthony Albanese is wrestling with divisions inside the party.

Oct 24, 2019 • 17m04s

Lock ’em up

Australia is almost alone its willingness to lock up primary-school-age children for criminal offences, but “tough on crime” politics means there is little will to change this.

Oct 25, 2019 • 14m57s

To Howard with love

Paul Bongiorno on how the Liberal Party celebrates and how the National Party brawls.

Oct 28, 2019 •

Swallowed by the sea (part one)

A decision to hand planning about sea-level rise to local council has opened up a war around science, property values and influence.

Oct 29, 2019 • 16m37s

Swallowed by the sea (part two)

How the American anti-climate-science lobby hijacked local councils in Australia, changing sea-level benchmarks as it went.

Oct 30, 2019 • 16m22s

Strip-searched in Newtown

As the number of police strip-searches rises in NSW, a law enforcement commission considers whether many of them are actually legal.

Oct 31, 2019 • 18m32s

Rosie Batty’s next fight

Rosie Batty on Pauline Hanson’s family law inquiry, and why governments won’t do more to stop domestic violence.

Nov 1, 2019 • 14m18s

The surplus disease

The Morrison government is committed to a budget surplus above all else. But as Paul Keating points out, this commitment can be a kind of sickness.

Nov 4, 2019 • 16m38s

Looking for Albanese

Anthony Albanese was shaped by the circumstances of his childhood. The question now is if his working-class background can help Labor reconnect to its working-class base.

Nov 6, 2019 • 18m40s

Green-energy superpower

Ross Garnaut – the man who wrote the Rudd government’s response to climate change – says Australia has more to gain from a zero-carbon future than any other developed country.

Nov 7, 2019 • 15m48s

The death toll of inequality

In Australia, the gap in life expectancy between the rich and poor has reached 10 years – the outcome of “savage capitalism”.

Nov 8, 2019 • 15m46s

The sniff, the scent of victory

As Labor responds to an internal review of its election defeat, some in the party feel they have already lost the next election.

Nov 11, 2019 • 16m30s

What’s happening in Queensland?

Lech Blaine grew up in country Queensland. After the 2019 federal election, he spent several weeks driving around the state, trying to understand what makes it different.

Nov 12, 2019 • 15m03s

Morrison’s darkest speech yet

Scott Morrison’s speech to the Queensland Resources Council has been called a defining moment in his leadership. Mike Seccombe on what it says about his “ordinary bloke” mask.

Nov 13, 2019 • 15m02s

Sums in a notepad: mental health and work

The federal government spends twice as much on income support for people affected by mental illness as it does on treatment. Rick Morton on living inside these figures – and the “arithmetic of existence”.

Nov 14, 2019 • 15m 04s

ASIO officers broke law on warrant

We don’t know what exactly happened or what ASIO was investigating; those details are secret. We do know that early last year the spy agency broke the law while conducting an operation.

Nov 15, 2019 • 14m 59s

The burning truth

As fires burn through NSW and Queensland, a fundamental shift can be detected in Canberra: the politics of climate change have altered.

Nov 18, 2019 • 17m 33s

Thoughts and prayers are not enough

Last week, a million hectares of eastern Australia was burnt in catastrophic bushfires. In the main, politicians refused to acknowledge the science that links these fires to climate change.

Nov 19, 2019 • 16m 40s

Changing consent law

A review of consent laws in New South Wales is recommending changes to how juries interpret sexual assaults and the onus that is placed on defendants. Bri Lee on the response from frontline organisations and the woman whose case triggered the inquiry.

Nov 20, 2019 • 15m 48s

The cabinet maker

Since becoming prime minister, Scott Morrison has stamped himself on the cabinet process. There will be more PowerPoints, and less debate about issues he sees as being routine.

Nov 21, 2019 • 14m 15s

The next fight on Uluru

Summary: Scott Morrison’s co-design process rules out the key aspirations of the Uluru Statement from the Heart. But there are signs that a new political fight is about to begin.

Nov 22, 2019 • 15m 02s

Robo-debt and China (a week in two acts)

The Morrison government has halted its robo-debt program, finally confronting issues with the troubled scheme. Separately, the government has affirmed its reliance on Chinese trade – irrespective of human rights concerns.

Nov 24, 2019 • 20m 02s

The red princeling

Xi Jinping’s ambitions for China are paranoid and expansionist. His mindset mirrors that of the guerrilla fighters in the Chinese Civil War.

Nov 26, 2019 • 15m 08s

Peter Ridd’s European adventure

A speaking tour of Europe has revealed the strategy behind Peter Ridd’s rejection of reef science: he believes that if people doubt the reef is dying, they will doubt climate change more broadly.

Nov 27, 2019 • 16m 19s

The politicians fighting to bring Assange home

As Julian Assange fights against extradition to the United States, an unlikely group of politicians is working to have him returned to Australia.

Nov 28, 2019 • 17m 12s

Fascism and troll culture

According to Jeff Sparrow, a new fascism is emerging from the internet – one rooted in meme culture, but that harnesses mass shootings as a political tool.

Nov 29, 2019 • 15m 12s

Defending Angus Taylor (the lone wolf and the albatross)

Scott Morrison has put himself in a difficult position, calling the NSW police commissioner to check on an investigation into his own minister.

Dec 2, 2019 • 16m 17s

Inside the Westpac scandal

As the fallout from the Westpac scandal continues, attempts are already underway to limit corporate responsibility.

Dec 3, 2019 • 15m45s

Andrew Bolt vs Dark Emu

Andrew Bolt has led a campaign against Bruce Pascoe and his book Dark Emu. But after reading the explorer journals on which the book is based, Rick Morton was unable to find any errors.

Dec 4, 2019 • 15m40s

George Megalogenis on Australia’s next decade

As the first two decades of the 21st century come to an end, George Megalogenis considers Australia’s place as a middle power and the demographics that will change our parliament.

Dec 5, 2019 • 15m28s

Angus Taylor’s hydrogen scandal

How the government – led by Angus Taylor and Matt Canavan – is ensuring Australia’s hydrogen industry is controlled by fossil fuels.

Dec 6, 2019 • 16m06s

Jacqui Lambie’s secret deal

Jacqui Lambie says she has a deal with the government to repeal medevac. She won’t say what it is, and the government says it never existed.

Dec 9, 2019 • 17m 48s

The man who didn’t kill Colin Winchester (part one)

David Eastman was thought of as a serial pest, until he was convicted of killing Australia’s police chief. The problem was, he didn’t do it.

Dec 10, 2019 • 16m 11s

The man who didn’t kill Colin Winchester (part two)

Following his wrongful conviction for the murder of Canberra’s top police officer, David Eastman sought compensation. But bigger questions remain, about mental health and the law.

Dec 11, 2019 • 13m 41s

The big wedge (Or: How Murdoch lobbies government)

Following an inquiry into digital platforms, the government finds itself wedged between News Corp and the tech giants. Both sides are lobbying heavily.

Dec 12, 2019 • 16m 57s

What happened to David Savage

Seven years ago, David Savage was injured while working for the Australian government in Afghanistan. He has fought since to have his compensation settled and the truth of what happened acknowledged.

Dec 13, 2019 • 15m 05s

Where there’s smoke, there’s climate change

As fires burn across the east coast and Sydney suffers catastrophic air pollution, the Coalition government is arguing to do less on climate change.

Dec 16, 2019 • 16m 31s

Return to Stasiland

Thirty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, Anna Funder on how understanding the Stasi can help us comprehend the age of surveillance in which we live.

Dec 17, 2019 • 17m 11s

Brian Houston, we have a problem

As the Hillsong Church booms internationally, its local arm is still dealing with the fallout from the royal commission into child sexual abuse.

Dec 18, 2019 • 12m34s

Helen Garner’s diary

Helen Garner has been keeping a diary for as long as she has been a writer. She published extracts from last year’s in the latest issue of The Monthly.

Dec 19, 2019 • 13m 34s

What is Labor doing on coal?

Anthony Albanese says ending Australian coal exports won’t halt climate change. He says we need to cut emissions, but Adani should get on with it and start digging in the Galilee Basin.

Dec 20, 2019 • 16m 04s

A very Morrison Christmas

As fires continue on both sides of the continent, and the government succeeds in putting off commitments at the UN climate talks, Scott Morrison has gone on holidays.

Jan 27, 2020 • 13m 36s

Fighting fire with... what?

The bushfire season still has months to run. The question is whether volunteers can make it through another crisis without radical changes to how they work.

Jan 28, 2020 • 15m 51s

Brendan Nelson’s gravy sandwich

As minister for defence, Brendan Nelson controversially spent $6.6 billion on Boeing fighter jets. Now he is running the company’s Australian division.

Jan 29, 2020 • 14m 55s

Sports grants are the tip of the iceberg

As the government deals with the Bridget McKenzie scandal, questions are being asked about other larger grant programs.

Jan 30, 2020 • 14m 03s

Exclusive: Red Cross staff speak out

Current and former Red Cross staff have criticised the way the organisation is handling donations during Australia’s bushfire crisis.

Jan 31, 2020 • 13m 47s

Scott Morrison’s eternal present

As Scott Morrison pivots to the coronavirus evacuation and deploys the military to the fire zone, questions are being asked about the management of both responses.

Feb 3, 2020 • 14m 18s

The prime minister and the dung beetle

Don Watson on why Scott Morrison is not really a politician, and how meaning left politics.

Feb 4, 2020 • 12m 41s

Honouring Bettina Arndt, men’s rights activist

Controversial men’s rights activist Bettina Arndt has been appointed a Member of the Order of Australia. Feminist academic Eva Cox considered giving back her AO in protest – and says it’s more evidence the system needs to change.

Feb 5, 2020 • 14m 41s

What happens if we don’t stop coronavirus?

As coronavirus shuts borders and creates global panic, Rick Morton explains where the virus originated and looks at attempts to combat it.

Feb 6, 2020 • 13m 56s

Australia’s secret emissions target

Every state and territory government in Australia has a target of net zero emissions by 2050. What are the benefits, and the risks, of the states defying the federal government?

Feb 7, 2020 • 13m 35s

Barnaby Joyce’s failed coup

Barnaby Joyce lost his leadership tilt but has reopened a schism in the Coalition on climate policy.

Feb 10, 2020 • 18m 35s

Profiting from Auschwitz: How 4 million books were sold on fabrications

Australian author Heather Morris has made millions selling books about the Holocaust, but the people in them are unrecognisable to their families.

Feb 11, 2020 • 13m 25s

Did Clive Palmer buy an election for $84 million?

From the point of view of his failed candidates, Clive Palmer’s campaign was a success. So what does $84 million buy you at an election?

Feb 12, 2020 • 13m 57s

The love story behind Australia’s biggest political donation

Scott Morrison received the biggest individual political donation in Australian history. Behind it was a love story – and a man who asked for nothing in return.

Feb 13, 2020 • 14m 48s

The tiny town where Scott Morrison is building a nuclear dump

Australia’s first nuclear dump is set to be built in a small town in South Australia. The government has spent millions trying to win over locals – but the community is viciously divided.

Feb 14, 2020 • 14m 53s

Llew ‘Who’ O’Brien and the National Party turducken

Why the chaos that installed Llew O’Brien as deputy speaker is really about Queensland state politics - and how it’s set the clock on nine months of dysfunction from the Coalition.

Feb 17, 2020 • 13m 02s

Zali Steggall’s climate breaker

How a British model to end climate dysfunction is being introduced in parliament and could work here.

Feb 18, 2020 • 13m 15s

Plants, mental health and an unrecognised humanitarian crisis

Asylum seekers who have been cut off from government support are finding solace in an unexpected place: their own community garden.

Feb 19, 2020 • 14m 51s

Suing over Howard’s camps

The government has spent more than a decade fighting compensation claims launched by more than 60 former asylum seekers detained in Australia’s notorious detention centres. Today, we ask why it’s taking so long.

Feb 20, 2020 • 14m 52s

The minister for nuclear power

Meet Keith Pitt - climate sceptic, coal evangelist and the parliament’s most strident nuclear advocate. He’s also the new minister for Water and Resources.

Feb 21, 2020 • 12m 51s

Does Scott Morrison finally have a climate policy?

Scott Morrison is sandwiched between the climate deniers in his own government on one side and Russell Crowe on the other, as he tries to come up with a new climate policy.

Feb 24, 2020 • 11m 39s

How billions in government spending could be unlawful

In the past year, the government has directed nearly $5 billion to various schemes using a process lawyers say is likely unconstitutional.

Feb 25, 2020 • 12m 25s

The prison riot sparked by climate change

A prison riot sparked by an intense heat wave shows how vulnerable prisoners are to the impacts of extreme weather. Stella Maynard on how climate change is making prisons even more punitive.

Feb 26, 2020 • 14m 25s

We need to talk about St Kevin’s

In today’s episode, we speak to former St Kevin’s student Luke Macaronas about what stops elite private schools and other powerful institutions from addressing issues of abuse.

Feb 27, 2020 • 16m 57s

How coronavirus feeds Australian racism

The panic generated by coronavirus has reignited an older, deeper panic about Chinese migrants. Today, we look at what coronavirus can tell us about racism in Australia.

Feb 28, 2020 • 12m 30s

Scott Morrison’s fortunate disaster

Coronavirus has provided Scott Morrison with an opportunity to re-establish his leadership credentials, but will it work? Today, Paul Bongiorno on how the prime minister is making the most of this crisis.

Mar 2, 2020 • 13m 45s

The town without abortion

A consortium of powerful religious doctors has made it impossible to choose a surgical abortion in one of Australia’s largest regional towns – even in the public hospital there.

Mar 3, 2020 • 15m 10s

Could we end domestic violence?

The murder of Hannah Clarke and her children has put Australia’s failure to grapple with domestic violence back on the national agenda. Today, Bri Lee on the changes we need to make to keep women and children safe.

Mar 4, 2020 • 13m 31s

Labor’s climate smokescreen

Labor has now got an emissions target, but no mechanism for getting there. The party’s current position is a far cry from the world-leading climate policies the party used to champion. Mike Seccombe on how Labor lost its nerve.

Mar 5, 2020 • 16m 11s

A fear at the end of the earth

After speaking to scores of ordinary people about climate change, James Button reflects on the anxieties and contradictions in our approach to the future.

Mar 6, 2020 • 13m 17s

My name’s Scott Morrison, and I have a truth problem

Scott Morrison has admitted he attempted to invite Hillsong founder Brian Houston to a White House dinner. But why did he deny it for so long? And is he telling the truth about his office’s involvement in the sports grants scandal?

Mar 10, 2020 • 18m 40s

White terror, part one: 35 widows

A year on from the Christchurch massacre, survivors face isolation and economic hardship. In part one of a three-part special, we speak to the men and women living through the aftermath.

Mar 11, 2020 • 18m 50s

White terror, part two: The dossier

A secret ASIO document warns of the threat of far-right terrorism in Australia. In detail never before published, it outlines the risk Australia faces from those who believe in an impending “race war”.

Mar 12, 2020 • 16m 20s

White terror, part three: The itch at your back

A year on from the Christchurch terrorist attack, Muslims in Australia are still wrestling with a new level of fear. Many are questioning the way the media and politics have stoked division.

Mar 13, 2020 •

Can Team Australia beat the coronavirus?

With economic and social effects of the coronavirus outbreak accelerating, the government has finally released the details of a $17.6 billion stimulus package. Today, Paul Bongiorno on whether the government’s actions will be enough to stave off a recession.

Mar 16, 2020 • 15m 55s

The future of dairy

Animal-free milk could wipe out the traditional dairy industry within the decade. Today, Lesley Hughes on the future of alternative milk and what it means for Australia.

Mar 17, 2020 • 15m 05s

Trust in the time of coronavirus

Public trust in government is at an all time low, just as we’re turning to our political leaders to tackle the coronavirus outbreak.

Mar 18, 2020 • 13m 45s

George Pell’s last stand

Last week the High Court heard George Pell’s appeal against his conviction for child sex abuse. Today, Rick Morton discusses Pell’s last bid for freedom and what could happen next.

Mar 19, 2020 • 15m 20s

Ten questions about coronavirus

What are the symptoms of coronavirus? What can people do to stay safe? What kind of responses will be the most effective? Today, Rick Morton answers some of our basic questions about coronavirus.

Mar 20, 2020 • 13m 30s

The day coronavirus swallowed Scott Morrison

With the cost of coronavirus growing everyday, will Scott Morrison’s stimulus be big enough and fast enough? Today, Paul Bongiorno, on the future of the economy, and the Prime Minister.

Mar 23, 2020 • 13m 50s

Coronavirus, part one: The frontline

As the number of confirmed coronavirus cases grows in Australia, Dr Nenad Macesic describes how doctors are handling the pandemic and what the future holds. This is part one of a five-part special.

Mar 24, 2020 • 14m 00s

Coronavirus, part two: How the government failed

Medical experts say that the government’s slow response to the coronavirus outbreak has left Australia exposed. In part two of our series on COVID-19, Mike Seccombe on the challenge our country and health system is facing.

Mar 25, 2020 • 12m 55s

Coronavirus, part three: the economics of a shutdown

With hundreds of thousands of Australians losing their jobs, the economic cost of coronavirus is becoming clear. Today, chief economist at The Australia Institute Richard Dennis on how we can get through the next 18 months.

Mar 26, 2020 • 14m 10s

Coronavirus, part four: the Australian scientists who could beat it

A team of Australian scientists are working around the clock to find a vaccine against coronavirus, and they’re on the verge of a breakthrough. Today, Rick Morton on the race to find a vaccine.

Mar 27, 2020 • 12m 40s

Coronavirus, part five: One month in

Scott Morrison’s first national address on coronavirus was one month ago. Today, Paul Bongiorno on the decisions his government has made since then and how they stack up.

Mar 30, 2020 • 16m 45s

How to survive the shutdown

As more of Australia goes into coronavirus isolation, advice is being offered on how to manage mental health during a viral pandemic that forces us to separate. We speak to a Melbourne family who have been in isolation for almost 80 days.

Mar 31, 2020 • 15m 00s

Hoaxes, lies and coronavirus

With misinformation about coronavirus rampant, we look at what the spread of the virus is telling us about news, social media, and who we trust.

Apr 1, 2020 • 14m 00s

Should we bail out the airlines?

Australia’s airlines have been hit hard by coronavirus, and they’re asking the government for billions of dollars in financial support. Today, Royce Kurmelovs, on whether it’s time the government nationalised the airline industry.

Apr 2, 2020 • 16m 15s

A Nobel prize winner explains coronavirus

Professor Peter Doherty won the Nobel prize for his research on how our bodies fight off viruses. Today, we ask him what makes Covid-19 different from other infections, and what we should be doing now to prepare for the next pandemic.

Apr 3, 2020 • 14m 15s

How Scott Morrison became an accidental socialist

The past week has completely changed the way politics works in Australia, with a right-wing government introducing the most radical economic measures in a generation. Today, Paul Bongiorno on the political earthquake that rocked Parliament House.

Apr 4, 2020 • 15m08s

Bonus episode: Behind the scenes at The Saturday Paper and The Monthly

In a special bonus episode of 7am hear from the show’s editor, Osman Faruqi, editor of The Monthly, Nick Feik, and editor of The Saturday Paper, Maddison Connaughton about how they’re adapting to the shutdown, and what role journalism can play in a crisis.

Apr 6, 2020 • 14m 40s

Surviving the economic turmoil of coronavirus

What happens when everyone in a household loses work because of coronavirus? Today we look at the human cost of unemployment and what the government is doing to help people survive.

Apr 7, 2020 • 14m 40s

Policing a pandemic

In response to the coronavirus pandemic, police have been granted extensive new powers to crack down on public association, private gatherings and travel. Today, Mike Seccombe on how Australia is policing a pandemic.

Apr 8, 2020 • 15m 00s

The women and children at risk in a lockdown (plus, the Pell verdict)

The coronavirus lockdown has led to an increase in domestic violence reports, but many victims aren’t able to access support services. Today, Rick Morton on how life has become even more dangerous for some women and children.

Apr 9, 2020 • 13m 30s

How coronavirus could break the NBN

The NBN is facing it’s most crucial test yet, and there are serious questions over whether the network will handle the unprecedented demand. Today, Paddy Manning on our virtual lifeline, and how it’s holding up.

Apr 10, 2020 • 14m 07s

Spotlight: Tracing the source of coronavirus

As coronavirus shuts borders and creates global panic, Rick Morton explains where the virus originated and looks at attempts to combat it.

Apr 11, 2020 • 18m 05m

Spotlight: Looking back at Christchurch

A year on from the Christchurch massacre, survivors face isolation and economic hardship. In part one of a three-part special, we speak to the men and women living through the aftermath.

Apr 12, 2020 • 18m 31s

Spotlight: Inside Australia's biggest cult

Following the death of cult leader Anne Hamilton-Byrne, surviving members of The Family reckon with judgement.

Apr 13, 2020 • 17m 27s

Spotlight: Badiucao, Chinese dissident

Months before the latest protests in Hong Kong, the Chinese government shut down an art exhibition by Chinese-Australian dissident Badiucao. This is his story.

Apr 14, 2020 • 14m 15s

The other holes in Australia’s quarantine

Confusion between different levels of government has exposed flaws in Australia’s strict quarantine measures, and they go beyond the case of the Ruby Princess. Today, Karen Middleton on the other holes in Australia’s quarantine.

Apr 15, 2020 • 12m 50s

Taking back control of our super

Australian superannuation accounts are tumbling because of the coronavirus pandemic. Today, Richard Dennis on how our secretive $2 trillion super industry is spending our money and what needs to change.

Apr 16, 2020 • 12m 30s

What governments are hiding behind coronavirus

While the country’s attention has been focused on the fight against coronavirus, Energy Minister Angus Taylor has forged ahead with a plan to prop up a coal-fired power generator. Today, Mike Seccombe on the push to undermine environmental protections during this crisis.

Apr 17, 2020 • 13m 38s

Virus economics: you and whose numbers

With the global economy facing its biggest downturn since the Great Depression, the Treasury and the IMF are at odds on the extent of the damage in Australia. Today, Paul Bongiorno on the competing economic forecasts for the country, and the way forward.

Apr 20, 2020 • 15m 05s

“I can survive until the end of May, maximum.”

There are over 1 million migrant workers in Australia who aren’t eligible for any financial support from the government as they try to navigate their way through this crisis. Some face destitution and homelessness. Today, we speak to one migrant worker negotiating this new reality.

Apr 21, 2020 • 15m 10s

The coronavirus endgame

As the number of coronavirus infections in Australia stabilises, talk has turned to how and when this crisis might end. Today, Mike Seccombe weighs up the different exit-strategies and analyses the coronavirus end game.

Apr 22, 2020 • 16m 30s

The truth about coronavirus fines

Analysis of the fines for the Covid-19 public health orders reveals a disproportionate number have been issued in places where Indigenous Australians and those from migrant backgrounds live. Today, what the pandemic is revealing about racial bias in policing.

Apr 23, 2020 • 15m 30s

The inside story of Australia’s coronavirus supercluster

Tasmania’s Covid-19 supercluster has forced hospitals to close and lead to thousands of residents being quarantined. Today, we investigate how a severe shortage of protective equipment and the encouragement of dubious practices preceded the deadly outbreak.

Apr 24, 2020 • 15m 30s

Malcolm Turnbull’s last word

Former prime minister Malcolm Turnbull went on a media blitz this week to promote his new book. In the memoir Turnbull shares his brutally honest opinion on the current prime minister and senior cabinet ministers. Today, Paul Bongiorno on Malcolm Turnbull’s return to centre stage.

Apr 27, 2020 • 15m 50s

Anthony Albanese’s pandemic response

Labor leader Anthony Albanese is juggling the need to appear constructive while holding the government to account. But what does the public actually want from their opposition during this crisis? Today, Karen Middleton on the Opposition’s tactics in a pandemic.

Apr 28, 2020 • 13m 04s

How Indigenous communities got in front of the pandemic

Remote Aboriginal communities across Australia reacted swiftly and effectively to the Covid-19 outbreak, reflecting the disproportionate burden these communities carry when it comes to infectious disease. Today, Amy McQuire on the pandemic and self-determination.

Apr 29, 2020 • 15m 15s

The generation “done over” by coronavirus

Younger workers are bearing the brunt of the current economic downturn, just like they did during the GFC. Today, Mike Seccombe on how the pandemic is fuelling generational inequality.

Apr 30, 2020 • 17m 10s

Evangelical Christianity in the age of coronavirus

The Prime Minister’s relationship to the founder of Hillsong has focused attention on the church. But what does evangelical Christianity look like in an age of climate change and coronavirus? Today, Lech Blaine on the appeal of Hillsong and how it influences the most powerful politician in the country.

May 1, 2020 • 15m 43s

How Scott Morrison sparked a new war with China

Scott Morrison’s push for an inquiry into the coronavirus outbreak has further strained Australia’s relationship with China. The Chinese government has expressed concern and threatened retaliation. Today, Paul Bongiorno on a new low in Chinese–Australian relations.

May 2, 2020 • 12m28s

Bonus episode: Morry Schwartz on starting The Monthly

To celebrate The Monthly’s 15th birthday, we hear from its publisher, Morry Schwartz, and its current editor, Nick Feik, on the magazine’s journey and what it contributes to Australia’s media landscape.

May 4, 2020 • 15m 16s

The real reason supermarket shelves were empty

When the pandemic hit Australia stores across the country were stripped of food and other essential items. The situation revealed deep vulnerabilities in our food supply system. Today, Margaret Simons on why our supermarkets weren’t prepared for this crisis.

May 5, 2020 • 14m 24s

The 160,000 jobs lost while the government waited

Serious questions are being asked about whether the timing of the government’s economic relief packages may have actually led to job losses. Today, Mike Seccombe on the flaws in our rescue package that could have cost 160,000 jobs.

May 6, 2020 • 14m 33s

Making sense of the Black Summer

Thousands of Australians had their homes and lives destroyed by last summer’s bushfires, and now Covid-19 is shattering their plans to rebuild. Today, Rick Morton on what happens when a pandemic follows a natural disaster.

May 7, 2020 •

Jane Caro on reopening schools

The Prime Minister is arguing that school closures are leaving the most disadvantaged students behind, and he’s calling for schools to reopen. Today, Jane Caro on how the political debate over coronavirus is reframing the inequality in education funding.

May 8, 2020 • 15m 44s

Snakes in the garden of Eden-Monaro

Infighting within the Coalition has been exposed as candidates emerge and then quit in the race for the seat of Eden-Monaro. Today, columnist for The Saturday Paper Paul Bongiorno on the divisions laid bare, and the first real test for Scott Morrison’s popularity.

May 11, 2020 • 14m 55s

Inside the Newmarch cluster

An aged care facility in NSW is the site of one of Australia’s biggest clusters of Covid-19. Now, with 16 dead, the centre’s owners have been threatened with sanctions and the loss of their licence. Today, Rick Morton on what went wrong at Newmarch House.

May 12, 2020 • 14m 19s

Adam Bandt’s green capitalism

Three months since becoming leader of the Greens, Adam Bandt has begun articulating a plan for the party that embraces “green” capitalism, and sees their future in partnership with Labor. Today, Margaret Simons on what we need to know about Adam Bandt.

May 13, 2020 • 15m 59s

Australia’s worst coronavirus cluster

The decision to allow passengers on the Ruby Princess to disembark led to Australia’s biggest coronavirus cluster, and it’s now being investigated by a number of inquiries. Today, Karen Middleton on what happened in the hours leading up to the ship’s docking.

May 14, 2020 • 14m 32s

The ABC’s funding crisis

ABC staff are revealing the pressure they are under as the public broadcaster absorbs huge budget cuts. Today, Mike Seccombe on the role the ABC plays during a national crisis and the future of the national broadcaster.

May 15, 2020 • 15m 47s

Back in black. Cough, cough.

As the federal government struggles to rebuild Australia’s battered economy, the threat of a trade war with China risks hampering our recovery. Today, Paul Bongiorno on the twin challenges of rebuilding the economy, and managing our relationship with our largest trading partner.

May 18, 2020 • 16m 34s

The push to expand ASIO’s powers

Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton has recently introduced legislation to expand the surveillance powers available to Australia’s domestic spy agency. Lawyers and civil rights groups are concerned the proposed laws are too broad. Today, Karen Middleton on the attempt to expand ASIO’s powers in the midst of a pandemic.

May 19, 2020 • 16m 24s

How Covid-19 united conspiracy theorists

Conspiracy theorists have been energised by Covid-19, with misinformation on everything from 5G to vaccinations spreading online. Today, Rick Morton on where these theories really begin and the groups actively encouraging them.

May 20, 2020 • 15m 07s

Back on the tinnies

Pubs, restaurants and other businesses across the country are reopening and the government is predicting an economic comeback. But will the recovery be fast as hoped? Today, what one territory’s reopening can tell us about the path ahead.

May 21, 2020 • 16m 59s

Who is really planning Australia’s economic comeback?

The Prime Minister has appointed a panel of business leaders to develop a blueprint for the country’s economic recovery, but there are serious questions over how they were picked. Today, Mike Seccombe on the vested interests leading this panel and what they’re pushing for.

May 22, 2020 • 14m 49s

Don’t mention the trade war

The Morrison government’s excitement about a coronavirus inquiry cannot cover over the trade war opening up with China.

May 25, 2020 • 15m 47s

‘In my new home, I am loved.’

After five years on Manus Island, Imran Mohammad was resettled in Chicago. But the coronavirus shutdown has brought back memories of detention and isolation.

May 26, 2020 • 16m 06s

The crisis universities should have seen coming

Almost overnight, Australian universities lost billions of dollars in international student fees. Some are asking how they could have been so reckless in depending on this money in the first place.

May 27, 2020 • 16m 09s

Uber but for government money

How a private company won millions in government funding for an aged-care app with “no duty of care”.

May 28, 2020 • 16m 50s

The Accord according to Morrison

Scott Morrison’s appeal for a new compact between workers and business has reminded some of Bob Hawke’s 1980s Accord.

May 29, 2020 • 15m 01s

Morrison’s economy (unplugged)

Scott Morrison is strongly against further economic stimulus. But as a $60 billion hole shows up in the JobKeeper program, questions are being asked about whether enough is being spent.

Jun 1, 2020 • 15m 17s

The screens that ate school

Big Tech has become an integral part of education. But there are questions over how much private companies are influencing curricula and what data they are collecting.

Jun 2, 2020 • 16m 43s

When is a bushfire like a coronavirus?

Instead of making us forget the bushfires, evidence suggests coronavirus will make us more conscious of the need for change. The urgent response to the pandemic makes political arguments against climate action less credible.

Jun 3, 2020 • 13m 36s

Killed during the pandemic

Domestic violence workers warned that the pandemic would put women at risk – especially women on temporary visas. Last month, a woman was killed in exactly that situation.

Jun 4, 2020 • 16m 20s

Like a scene from ‘The Castle’

The Queensland town of Acland has been all but swallowed by a coal mine. There is only one resident left. Tomorrow the High Court will decide if he’ll be swallowed, too.

Jun 5, 2020 • 16m 31s

Tear gas in the Rose Garden

As protests against police violence and inequality continue in the United States, Scott Morrison had a private phone call with Donald Trump.

Jun 8, 2020 • 17m 19s

Spotlight: Inside the Tanya Day inquest

As the world protests the killing of George Floyd, Darumbal and South Sea Islander journalist Amy McQuire confronts Australia’s national silence on black deaths in custody.

Jun 9, 2020 • 17m 31s

Black Witness, White Witness

As the world protests the killing of George Floyd, Darumbal and South Sea Islander journalist Amy McQuire confronts Australia’s national silence on black deaths in custody.

Jun 10, 2020 • 15m 22s

How coronavirus is reopening the wage gap

As the recession upends convention on gendered job losses, there is fear decades of progress on wage equality could be lost overnight.

Jun 11, 2020 • 16m 53s

The theme park and the trillion dollar investment scheme

As Scott Morrison resists signing up to China’s Belt and Road Initiative, the country has begun focusing on lower levels of power - even the Gold Coast council.

Jun 12, 2020 • 14m 33s

Does Scott Morrison want an early election?

As Scott Morrison looks at a bleak five years economically, some in his own party think he’s gearing up for an early election.

Jun 15, 2020 • 15m 46s

Meet Australia’s marijuana terrorist

George Dickson is a cannabis law reformer. After an altercation with police, he was also classed as a high risk terrorist offender.

Jun 16, 2020 • 13m 21s

The power of tradesmen

As Scott Morrison announces his HomeBuilder scheme, there are serious questions about who it serves and how powerful tradesmen have become as a political bloc.

Jun 17, 2020 • 16m 01s

How we organised Melbourne’s Black Lives Matter rally

Warriors of the Aboriginal Resistance had five days to organise a huge Black Lives Matter rally in Melbourne. Under threat of fines and sustained criticism in the press, they coordinated one of the largest protests the city has seen.

Jun 18, 2020 • 17m 16s

The racism case Victoria Police didn't want

As debate over police accountability continues, research suggests predictive policing may be targeting racial minorities in Australia.

Jun 19, 2020 • 14m 12s

Everything you need to know about the Somyurek scandal

The Adem Somyurek scandal has now involved the federal Labor party, and poses a big question: who leaked?

Jun 22, 2020 • 16m 58s

What George Pell knew...

As the final pages of the royal commission into child sexual abuse have been unredacted, it’s become clear what George Pell knew and when.

Jun 23, 2020 • 15m 53s

The last family on Nauru

After almost a decade in detention, Mustafa and Salah are the only family left on Nauru. This is the story of their wait.

Jun 24, 2020 • 15m 33s

Justin Hemmes, the treasurer and the $100m wages case

New details have emerged in the Justin Hemmes wages case, as the treasurer confirms he consulted the businessman over the country’s largest ever spending measure.

Jun 25, 2020 • 16m 48s

It’s not about statues or Chris Lilley...

Osman Faruqi on how politics in Australia deliberately recasts racism as a matter of symbols and gestures - and how the media helps.

Jun 26, 2020 • 15m 40s

Politics and Dyson Heydon

The harassment allegations against Dyson Heydon have reminded some in Canberra of the royal commission that traded on his “stainless reputation”.

Jun 29, 2020 • 17m 13s

Donald Trump didn’t drop from the sky

As Donald Trump comes to the end of his first term, it is clear he has benefitted hugely from America’s divisions - in fact, he is the perfect expression of them.

Jun 30, 2020 • 15m 02s

Dyson Heydon and the misogyny of the law

As allegations mount against former High Court justice Dyson Heydon, Bri Lee has written about the way misogyny and harassment are embedded in the legal profession.

Jul 1, 2020 • 15m 15s

Existential threat: Murdoch and the ABC

As the ABC absorbs hundreds of job cuts, the government has commissioned another report into its operations – closely mirroring the concerns of Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp.

Jul 2, 2020 • 17m 46s

The truth about Australia’s coal curse

Australia’s economy is at a crossroads. Its current dependence on coal has its roots in a model built on wool exports, and it needs to change.

Jul 3, 2020 • 15m 48s

The Eden-Monaro Missile Crisis

The timing of Scott Morrison’s $270 billion defence announcement is being linked to votes in Eden-Monaro as much as it is to the country’s strategic future.

Jul 6, 2020 • 16m 18s

The case for moving Cook

The City of Sydney is being petitioned to remove Thomas Woolner’s Cook statue from Hyde Park, and place it in a public museum.

Jul 7, 2020 • 15m 38s

The other side of the glass

Seven years after the NDIS was established, thousands of young people are still being forced to live in aged-care homes.

Jul 8, 2020 • 13m 24s

Locked in the nine blocks

Five days ago, the Andrews government used police to lock down nine public housing towers. We spoke to one resident, Hulya, about what is happening inside.

Jul 9, 2020 • 14m 25s

Morrison’s rule by ‘Henry VIII’ clauses

During Covid-19, the government has been increasingly using ‘Henry VIII’ clauses to bypass the parliament and make laws that are never voted on.

Jul 10, 2020 • 16m 48s

Morrison to the virus: ‘Ich bin ein Melburnian’

As Victoria enters a second lockdown, Scott Morrison has offered an apolitical response to the Labor state.

Jul 13, 2020 • 19m 30s

The man inside (part one)

When Ramzi Aouad went to prison for life, it was on the basis of evidence from one man - a violent enforcer who had been offered financial incentives for his testimony.

Jul 14, 2020 • 17m 15s

The man inside (part two)

The sentencing of Ramzi Aouad came at a tense moment in racialised policing – and there are now people asking if the politics around “Middle Eastern crime” played a part.

Jul 15, 2020 • 15m 37s

Setting up for the second wave

With Victoria one week into its second shutdown, and NSW on high alert, there are new fears about what a second wave could mean for Australia’s coronavirus recovery.

Jul 16, 2020 • 17m 26s

If you are queer - or care about queer people - listen to this story

Daniel van Roo spent 18 months trying to convince his doctors he was sick. As his undiagnosed cancer worsened, they continued to test only for STIs - he says because he was gay

Jul 17, 2020 • 15m 56s

The Prime Minister for NSW

As the pandemic worsens in Victoria, Scott Morrison has been careful to distance himself from bad news.

Jul 20, 2020 • 15m 18s

Why we need to “feel” climate change

As climate models predict even worse outcomes for the planet, some scientists believe the way to change what is happening is for people to “feel” the emotion of it.

Jul 21, 2020 • 14m 58s

The moment Australia almost beat coronavirus

In the middle of last month, Australia had its last chance to contain the coronavirus pandemic. One strain of the virus was all but defeated, but then a second broke out.

Jul 22, 2020 • 17m 59s

A night at the opera: How Whitlam and Kerr fell out

After a 10-year legal battle, the “palace letters” were finally released last week. They show exactly how Gough Whitlam’s relationship with the governor-general broke down.

Jul 23, 2020 • 13m 34s

Scott Morrison and the invisible woman

The decision to pull subsidies from childcare has caused alarm in the sector - especially because it is the only industry where this has happened.

Jul 24, 2020 • 15m 35s

The broke and the brittle

As the government reveals the extent of the budget deficit, Scott Morrison has become increasingly short in answering questions.

Jul 27, 2020 • 14m 56s

Face masks – the million dollar question

Ten key questions on the science of face masks, as experts hunt for consensus.

Jul 28, 2020 • 17m 27s

Penny Wong on what happens after coronavirus

Penny Wong warns that coronavirus could unravel the rules-based system on which the modern world is founded. The shadow foreign minister says we must guard against trends towards nationalism and xenophobia.

Jul 29, 2020 • 13m 51s

Who is Neville Power, the man leading Australia's coronavirus recovery?

The Prime Minister has revamped the National Covid Coordination Commission, the body he tasked with leading Australia’s pandemic recovery. But what do we really know about Neville Power, the man in charge? Today, Margaret Simons on Power’s background, and what the Commission is actually doing.

Jul 30, 2020 • 14m 20s

Coronavirus and the rise of "zombie charities"

With volunteers staying at home due to Covid and donations drying up, there are serious concerns about the viability of Australia’s charity sector. Today, Mike Seccombe on the challenges charities are facing, and what we might lose if they collapse.

Jul 31, 2020 • 13m 07s

Pandemic politics: Morrison vs. Andrews

Throughout the Covid pandemic traditional political hostilities have been dialled back, and governments have tried to project a sense of national unity. But that’s starting to fray. Today, Paul Bongiorno on the growing political stoush over the crisis in Victoria’s aged care system.

Aug 1, 2020 • 24m 15s

The Saturday Quiz: Kate McLennan and Kate McCartney

Kate McLennan and Kate McCartney from Get Krack!n solve The Saturday Paper’s quiz. Who would invite Hitler to open the Olympics? Does the existence of a Henry VIII suggest a Henry VII? What do you learn at private school?

Aug 3, 2020 • 15m 40s

How Morrison is using coronavirus to destroy his critics

What drives Scott Morrison? And what can we learn about his ideology from the way he’s governing during this moment? Today, Richard Cooke on how the Prime Minister is using the pandemic to fulfil his political objectives.

Aug 4, 2020 • 16m 33s

The Covid crisis in aged care

Aged care has been one of the hardest hit sectors during this phase of the Covid pandemic, with residents and their carers making up a large proportion of those catching the virus. Today, Rick Morton on the crisis in our aged care facilities, and why we should have seen it coming.

Aug 5, 2020 • 14m 35s

Reaganomics is back, baby

As Treasurer Josh Frydenburg praises Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan’s economic policies, a controversial recovery plan is gaining traction. In today’s episode, Mike Seccombe discusses whether Australia can spend its way out of the crisis.

Aug 6, 2020 • 16m 02s

What happens if you survive coronavirus

Today, we look at the people who call themselves coronavirus ‘long-haulers’ and the emerging research into their long lasting symptoms.

Aug 7, 2020 • 14m 43s

Morrison’s coronavirus backdowns

While most of the focus has been on Victoria, behind the scenes the federal government has been sending mixed-messages on economic policy and state border closures. Today, Paul Bongiorno on whether Scott Morrison is accurately reading the mood of the electorate during this phase of the crisis.

Aug 9, 2020 • 18m49s

The Saturday Quiz: Sarah Snook and Dave Lawson

Recent Emmy nominee Sarah Snook and the guy from the 7-Eleven ads, Dave Lawson, take on The Saturday Paper’s quiz. What’s the best use for a Logie? What’s your middle name? And if you just repeat the question back to the quizmaster, will they answer it for you?

Aug 10, 2020 • 16m 01s

“I am always going to be an ex-prisoner.”

As calls for police reform and prison abolition grow across the world, a new campaign in Australia led by formerly incarcerated women is seeking to combat the stigma of criminalisation. Today, Tabitha Lean, one of the organisers of that campaign, on life after prison.

Aug 11, 2020 • 15m 14s

The young Australians suing for climate action

Two Australians have launched court cases in an attempt to radically overhaul the way our government and big corporations are responding to climate change. Today, lawyer Kieran Pender on the story of climate litigation in Australia and what’s at stake.

Aug 12, 2020 • 16m 11s

Anatomy of a state of disaster

Ten days ago, Melbourne entered the strictest shutdown the country has seen so far. Today, senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton on the extraordinary powers a state of disaster bestows on the government, and how we got here.

Aug 13, 2020 • 14m 38s

Supercharging the generational wealth gap

The federal government’s decision to give workers access to their superannuation accounts risks dramatically increasing Australia’s generational wealth gap. Today, Mike Seccombe on how the government is reshaping the fundamental purpose of superannuation.

Aug 14, 2020 • 17m 05s

Scott Morrison, a man of inaction?

At the beginning of the pandemic Prime Minister Scott Morrison was keen to project himself as a unifying leader. But as the crisis has stretched on he’s adopted a much more reserved approach. Today, Paul Bongiorno on Morrison’s strategy of inaction and if it will work.

Aug 15, 2020 • 21m03s

The Saturday Quiz: Zoë Coombs Marr and Kate Jinx

Comedian Zoë Coombs Marr and programmer for the Melbourne International Film Festival Kate Jinx work their way through The Saturday Quiz.

Aug 17, 2020 • 16m 16s

Australia’s love of cops

This is a story about Australia’s psyche and the way our connection to policing makes us unique. During this pandemic, police have been handed unprecedented new powers, in stark contrast to the response elsewhere in the world. Today, Osman Faruqi on the nexus between police, politicians and the media.

Aug 18, 2020 • 16m 26s

Inside the race for a coronavirus vaccine

The federal government has announced that Australia is in “advanced discussions” with a number of companies over acquiring a potential coronavirus vaccine. But how close are scientists to actually making one, and does it matter who gets there first? Today, Rick Morton on the global race for a vaccine.

Aug 19, 2020 • 15m 54s

Inside the Ruby Princess: What went wrong

An inquiry examining the Ruby Princess saga has delivered its findings, six months after the ship docked. The cruise ship remains Australia’s largest coronavirus cluster. Today, Malcolm Knox, on who was responsible and what the inquiry found.

Aug 20, 2020 • 14m 27s

Another death in detention

The Australian government is currently holding over fifteen hundred people in immigration detention centres across the country, and many have been detained for years. Today, Karen Middleton on the fate of one those detainees, and the secrecy surrounding our immigration detention.

Aug 21, 2020 • 13m 59s

Look over there! A vaccine!

As a number of inquiries interrogate how prepared state and federal governments were for the coronavirus pandemic, the Prime Minister has evaded criticism by changing the topic to a potential coronavirus vaccine. Today, Paul Bongiorno on Scott Morrison’s attempt at distraction.

Aug 22, 2020 • 20m48s

The Saturday Quiz: Briggs and Tim Minchin

Rapper Briggs and musician Tim Minchin answer the ten questions from The Saturday Paper’s quiz, and spend an unusually long time talking about Winter Olympic gold medallist Steven Bradbury, considering there isn’t even a question about him.

Aug 24, 2020 • 16m 31s

Spying in the age of coronavirus

The coronavirus is ushering in a new era of international relations, and intelligence agencies and spycraft are a key part of that change. Today, former intelligence officer Andrew Davies on the world of spies during and after the pandemic.

Aug 25, 2020 • 15m 12s

Why coronavirus could mean fewer nurses

As our hospitals face pressure from coronavirus outbreaks, we’re relying on nurses more than ever. But at the same time, the pandemic means many nursing students may not be able to graduate. Today, Santilla Chingaipe on the looming shortfall in our health workforce.

Aug 26, 2020 • 17m 57s

Bob Brown and the end of the environment

As the federal government tries to hand power over environmental regulations to state governments, parallels have been drawn to the battles fought between activists and big business during the Howard years. Today, former Greens leader Bob Brown on how the legacy of John Howard’s environmental policies is shaping the current fight.

Aug 27, 2020 • 16m 30s

The phone call that caused the aged-care crisis

The ongoing crisis in aged care has become one of the defining elements of Australia’s second wave. There are currently over 1500 active cases linked to aged care in Victoria, and hundreds have died. Today, Rick Morton on the new details that explain what went so wrong, and what the government could have done to save lives.

Aug 28, 2020 • 16m 31s

The minister for not caring

In a week where the minister for aged care was unable to answer questions about the crisis in his portfolio, and details emerged about a branch stacking scandal in his own party, the Prime Minister is finding himself under increasing pressure. Today, Paul Bongiorno on whether we should be expecting more from our politicians.

Aug 29, 2020 • 24m42s

The Saturday Quiz: Celia Pacquola and Luke McGregor

In this episode of The Saturday Quiz, host John Leary is joined by the creators and stars of Rosehaven, Celia Pacquola and Luke McGregor. They attempt to answer questions ranging from presidents of African nations to how many children Rupert Murdoch has.

Aug 31, 2020 • 17m 16s

After Christchurch: the calm before the storm

Last week the Christchurch terrorist was sentenced to life without parole, the first time the sentence has ever been handed down. But even though he’s behind bars, his atrocities continue to inspire far-right extremists around the world. Today, Osman Faruqi on the increased threat of violent white nationalism and what happens after Christchurch.

Note: This episode contains use of the attacker’s full name.

Sep 1, 2020 • 15m 00s

Snapback: Scott Morrison's pandemic optimism

For months the prime minister has been projecting a return to normality, but what kind of Australia is waiting for us on the other side of the pandemic? Today, Sean Kelly on the type of society Scott Morrison envisions, and what might lie ahead.

Sep 2, 2020 • 16m 10s

Profiting off the unemployment boom

As Australia grapples with an unemployment crisis corporate job agencies are benefiting from a boom in government payments. Some are being accused of pressuring those looking for work. Today, Rick Morton on who is profiting from Australia’s unemployment industry.

Sep 3, 2020 • 16m 31s

How branch stacking helps conservatives

Serious allegations of branch stacking and factional warfare have engulfed both major parties in recent months, and the latest example even implicates senior federal ministers. Today, Mike Seccombe on why branch stacking has become more common, and how it’s influencing key policies.

Sep 4, 2020 • 15m 58s

Here comes the recession

The Treasurer Josh Frydenberg started this week by launching an extraordinary attack on Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews, and ended it by presiding over the biggest fall in economic activity in decades. Today, Paul Bongiorno on Australia’s economic predicament and who’s really to blame.

Sep 5, 2020 • 10m34s

Bonus: How we make 7am

To celebrate 300 episodes, we produced a special, behind-the-scenes feature on how we make 7am. We followed host Ruby Jones and senior reporter for The Saturday Paper Rick Morton as they put together an episode on the crisis in aged care.

Sep 7, 2020 • 18m 07s

The doctors, the Scientologists, and the journalist

A federal court has been re-examining controversial psychiatric treatments used in a Sydney hospital in the 1960s. The treatments drew the attention of the Church of Scientology, and led to a Royal Commission. Today, Lane Sainty on what happened at Chelmsford, and the journalist caught in the middle 30 years on.

Sep 8, 2020 • 14m 48s

5 Reasons Facebook Is Ditching News (You Won't Believe Number 3)

After lobbying from the Murdoch press and Nine newspapers, the government is trying to force Google and Facebook to pay for journalism. The tech giants have responded by threatening to stop sharing news from Australian outlets. Today, Mike Seccombe on the battle that will shape the future of media in this country.

Sep 9, 2020 • 15m 50s

Death tax for booty

Inheritance taxes are a feature of most advanced economies, including the UK and the US. But in Australia they haven’t been levied for 40 years, and their abolition has contributed to growing inequality in the country. Today, James Boyce on why now is the right time to restart the conversation on death taxes.

Sep 10, 2020 • 14m 44s

How to collect coronavirus

Cultural institutions in Australia have begun to collect evidence of how coronavirus is changing the country in real time, as part of a movement to collect ‘social histories’. But how difficult is the task, especially when there’s no national vision for collecting culture in our country.

Sep 11, 2020 • 15m 04s

Scott Morrison’s shattered cabinet

Scott Morrison is waging a war on two fronts this week. He’s locked in a battle with state governments to reopen borders, and he’s increasingly blaming the Victorian government for the severity of the state’s second wave. Today, Paul Bongiorno on the growing political divide across the country.

Sep 13, 2020 • 22m56s

The Saturday Quiz: Miranda Tapsell and James Colley

John Leary is joined by actor and writer Miranda Tapsell and writer and comedian James Colley in this episode of The Saturday Quiz. There’s film quotes, fast bowlers and young adult fiction.

Sep 14, 2020 • 17m 44s

Exclusive: Brett Sutton's leaked call

A leaked briefing from Victoria’s chief health officer has contradicted public statements on contact tracing, and highlighted flaws with the privatised response to coronavirus in the state. Today, Osman Faruqi details the extraordinary call, and what it means for Victoria’s roadmap out of the pandemic.

Sep 15, 2020 • 14m 33s

The politics of a coronavirus vaccine

A coronavirus vaccine is the best chance the world has of returning to some kind of normal, but the stalling of one of the most viable candidates last week was a reminder that nothing is guaranteed. Today, Karen Middleton on the Australian government’s plans and the likelihood of a vaccine in 2021.

Sep 16, 2020 • 15m 27s

Rupert Murdoch's next move

Australia has one of the most concentrated media markets in the world, and that concentration could worsen as Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp launches a new service. Today, Mike Seccombe, on how the Australian Associated Press was nearly shut down, and now faces the prospect of being starved out.

Sep 17, 2020 • 14m 37s

The calm before the recession

Australia’s economy has taken its biggest hit since the Great Depression, but so far government stimulus measures have cushioned most people and businesses from the worst impacts. Those stimulus measures are about to dry up. Today, the upcoming danger zone for Australia’s economy, and how we can avoid it.

Sep 18, 2020 • 15m 19s

The cliff and the climate

The federal Opposition is seeking to capitalise on the current economic downturn by arguing that the government’s policies are making things worse. Meanwhile, the prime minister is pinning his hopes on a gas-led recovery. Today, Paul Bongiorno on how Labor fired up, and the political battle over energy policy.